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End Money Bail

MYTH: Most people in jail have been found guilty of a crime. FACT: An average of 60% of people held in local jails have not been convicted of the crime they are accused of and are there because they are unable to pay bail. Black women suffer disproportionately from the trappings of bail. 72 percent…

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Want Diversity?

Because my network is diverse, white people often reach out to me asking me to connect them with people of color, because they want to diversify their organization, program, event, etc. While I am heartened by their desire for inclusivity, I hope to communicate that if they truly are sincere and want more than a…

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Keystone Voices

“In these challenging times we need black and brown female voices more than ever, so that our nation’s song of freedom is truly in tune with our moral consciousness, and that keystone voices keep us in rhythm with justice and collective freedom.” That is a quote from Sheneika Smith‘s guest column in the Asheville Citizen-Times,…

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Time, Talent, TREASURE

I first heard the phrase “time, talent, and treasure” from Tracey Greene-Washington, founder of the CoThinkk giving circle. It describes what we all have to contribute to things we believe in. In my life, I have mostly been able to contribute my time and talent, though I know that is not always an option for…

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Mid-Year Musing

Sitting here in the center of 2017, I am pausing to reflect on my work thus far this year, and what I have planned. As I gain more subscribers (thank you all), I feel it is important to put my writings here in the context of my other efforts. Hood Huggers International For the past…

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Trauma and Healing

The news these days is heartbreaking. As oppression has always been. My skin color means I will never fully understand the trauma of racism. My heart calls me to feel as much as I can, and to be of service as I can. My friend Lucia White posted these important words on Facebook yesterday, “Let…

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Holding History

Who shapes our memory? As my long-time readers know, I have a strong interest in history. Like many others, I believe understanding history is key to understanding our present, and essential if we are to create new frameworks for the future. Recently, three African American history stories came to my attention. How we hold history…

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Disrupt and Dismantle

Public art and monuments can influence the collective narrative. They can provoke new possibilities or perpetuate old systems. They can impact identity and self-perception. Today I am reflecting on the public art of the When Women Disrupt tour and on Confederate monuments, including Asheville’s own Vance monument. When Women Disrupt was “a tour of street art and…

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Engaging Through the Arts

It is my belief that the arts are essential for healing and transformation, that it takes creativity and creative expression to bring new paradigms into being. In that spirit, today’s post focuses on local arts-related events and news. So much goodness! I am looking forward to an inspiring week (and beyond). Kibwe: A Marionette Puppet…

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A Major Shift and More

“It was one of the most interesting meetings I’ve seen in a long, long time. And honestly, it did feel like something major had shifted. There were years when no one commented during budget public hearing. I don’t think that will ever happen again and think what we saw last night will be a lot…

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